Printed Nature

designed by Harry Thaler with

Harry Thaler presents, in collaboration with the 3D material brand the exhibition Printed Nature. The exhibition takes place during the Fuorisalone for the Milan Design Week within Alcova, an independent off-fair, from April 15th to 21st, 2024. In the magnificent historical setting of the nineteenth-century Villa Vagatti, the renowned Meranese designer will exhibit a new series of wooden furniture elements created through the innovative 3D printing process of econitWood™.

Harry Thaler presents, in collaboration with the 3D material brand the exhibition Printed Nature. The exhibition takes place during the Fuorisalone for the Milan Design Week within Alcova, an independent off-fair, from April 15th to 21st, 2024. In the magnificent historical setting of the nineteenth-century Villa Vagatti, the renowned Meranese designer will exhibit a new series of wooden furniture elements created through the innovative 3D printing process of econitWood™.

Responding to Alcova's vocation as a platform for designers, companies, institutions, and researchers studying the future of living and making, the Printed Nature exhibition offers unique design pieces that reconcile, in a perfect balance, high levels of functionality, technology, and sustainability.

The 3D printing process of , recently developed by the German company additive tectonics GmbH, employs wood waste from sawmills and timber harvesting ensuring–unlike conventional production–the maximum optimisation of raw materials according to the zero waste philosophy.

The result is an interior furnishing material with high sound-absorbing, thermal insulation, and fire-resistant qualities, for a potential final product that can be considered CO2 neutral.

Responding to Alcova's vocation as a platform for designers, companies, institutions, and researchers studying the future of living and making, the Printed Nature exhibition offers unique design pieces that reconcile, in a perfect balance, high levels of functionality, technology, and sustainability.

The 3D printing process of , recently developed by the German company additive tectonics GmbH, employs wood waste from sawmills and timber harvesting ensuring–unlike conventional production–the maximum optimisation of raw materials according to the zero waste philosophy.

The result is an interior furnishing material with high sound-absorbing, thermal insulation, and fire-resistant qualities, for a potential final product that can be considered CO2 neutral.

Inviting and sinuous seats, lamps that appear to emerge from the ground like clusters of fungi, but also simple stools and practical tables will inhabit the exhibition space of Printed Nature at Villa Vagatti. Greeting the furniture elements will be a scenery of wood powder reminiscent of desert dunes, emphasising the furniture creation process.

This scenario proposes itself as a natural and futuristic landscape, but also as a field of possibilities and the infinite experiments offered by the econitWood 3D printing technology. Experiments that Harry Thaler has approached with a playful attitude, designing warm and organic shapes, daring with sometimes unexpected and unimaginable proportions, according to a very precise approach: "This exhibition attempts to challenge and stretch further the boundaries of traditional architecture and design, an answer to our insatiable desire for innovation, aesthetics, and sustainable living," explains Harry Thaler.

Inviting and sinuous seats, lamps that appear to emerge from the ground like clusters of fungi, but also simple stools and practical tables will inhabit the exhibition space of Printed Nature at Villa Vagatti. Greeting the furniture elements will be a scenery of wood powder reminiscent of desert dunes, emphasising the furniture creation process.

This scenario proposes itself as a natural and futuristic landscape, but also as a field of possibilities and the infinite experiments offered by the econitWood 3D printing technology. Experiments that Harry Thaler has approached with a playful attitude, designing warm and organic shapes, daring with sometimes unexpected and unimaginable proportions, according to a very precise approach: "This exhibition attempts to challenge and stretch further the boundaries of traditional architecture and design, an answer to our insatiable desire for innovation, aesthetics, and sustainable living," explains Harry Thaler.

Harry Thaler

In his work, Harry Thaler reinterprets design by combining high quality and traditional craftsmanship with innovative forms and materials. Thaler obtained a Master's in Design Products from the Royal College of Art (2010). In the same year, Thaler opened his studio in London and developed the Pressed Chair, which immediately gained prominence. Trained earlier as a goldsmith, a methodology of work which strongly influences his working process.

Thaler collaborates with international companies such as Nils Holger Moormann, Pulpo, Davide Groppi, Monocle, Leaos, and Olev Light. His field of activity also includes designing interior and exterior spaces, as well as projects in the field of architecture. His work has been exhibited and shown internationally and has been awarded numerous recognitions.

Harry Thaler currently lives in Merano (Italy), where he has transformed a disused silo tower into his studio. From 2016 to 2019, Thaler taught at the Faculty of Design and Arts at the Free University of Bolzano.

Harry Thaler

In his work, Harry Thaler reinterprets design by combining high quality and traditional craftsmanship with innovative forms and materials. Thaler obtained a Master's in Design Products from the Royal College of Art (2010). In the same year, Thaler opened his studio in London and developed the Pressed Chair, which immediately gained prominence. Trained earlier as a goldsmith, a methodology of work which strongly influences his working process.

Thaler collaborates with international companies such as Nils Holger Moormann, Pulpo, Davide Groppi, Monocle, Leaos, and Olev Light. His field of activity also includes designing interior and exterior spaces, as well as projects in the field of architecture. His work has been exhibited and shown internationally and has been awarded numerous recognitions.

Harry Thaler currently lives in Merano (Italy), where he has transformed a disused silo tower into his studio. From 2016 to 2019, Thaler taught at the Faculty of Design and Arts at the Free University of Bolzano.